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Scotland votes 'no', remains in UK

The results are in on the Scottish independence referendum, reports CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera, on the historic vote.
Source: CNBC.com
Scotts say 'no'

CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera reports the results of Scotland's vote on independence.
Source: CNBC.com
Scotland rejects independence

The votes are in and Scots have decided to stay with the United Kingdom, reports CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera.
Source: CNBC.com
What Scot vote means for UK

Nigel Farage, UK Independence party leader, is in favor of Scotland staying part of Great Britain. CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera provides insight.
Source: CNBC.com
Investors confident 'no' wins in Scotland

CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera reports 4.2 million Scots are registered to vote for or against Scottish independence.
Source: CNBC.com
Oil revenues debate in UK

CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera explains the North Sea oil revenues are a key issue in the Scottish independence debate.
Source: CNBC.com
Sir Tom Hunter's message to Scots

Scottish businessman Sir. Thomas Hunter spoke to CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera about Scotland's referendum.
Source: CNBC.com
British pound recovers amid voting

CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera reports 4.2 million potential voters will head to the polls today to vote on Scotland's independence. Caruso-Cabrera tracks the reaction in the British pound today.
Source: CNBC.com
Fate of Union Jack

CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera reports the markets seem to be pricing in a "no vote" in regards to Scotland's independence vote from the United Kingdom. Caruso-Cabrera discusses the fate of the UK's national flag.
Source: CNBC.com
Votes in Scotland open

CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera reports Scotland polls opened this morning for the vote on whether the country should become independent from the United Kingdom or stay united.
Source: CNBC.com